what to eat in uttar pradesh

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What to Eat in Uttar Pradesh

Uttar Pradeshi thali with naan, sultani dal, raita, and shahi paneer.
41. Laddu
Laddu or Laddoo is a ball-shaped sweet popular in Indian Subcontinent as well as regions with immigrants from the Subcontinent such as Hijaz. Laddu is made of flour and sugar with other ingredients that vary by recipe. It is often served at festive or religious occasions.
42. Malapua
Malapua is an pancake served as a dessert or a snack. which is also served to Jagannath in his Sakala Dhupa (Morning food served to the lord). It is During Paush Sankranti, Malapuas are prepared in Bengali homes. Malapuas along with mutton curry is served in many non-vegetarian Maithil homes during Holi.Malapua for Raja festival What is known as malpua in West Bengal would be referred to as a type of halwa in Bangladesh. These are regional differences. Recipes vary between individuals and not necessarily regions.
43. Kheer
Kheer is a South Asian rice pudding made by boiling rice, broken wheat, or vermicelli with milk and sugar; it is flavoured with cardamom, raisins, saffron, cashew nuts, pistachios or almonds. It is typically served during a meal or as a dessert.
44. Barfi
Barfi is a sweet confectionery from the Indian subcontinent. Plain barfi is made with condensed milk and sugar cooked until it solidifies. The many varieties of barfi include besan barfi (made with gram flour), Kaaju Barfi (made with cashews), and Pista Barfi (made with ground pistachios). The name is derived from the Persian word Barf which means snow, since Barfi is similar to ice/snow in appearance, this is why it is served cold. Barfi is often flavored with fruit (such as mango or coconut) or nuts (such as cashew and pistachio) and spices such as cardamom or rose water. They are sometimes coated with a thin layer of edible metallic leaf known as vark. They are typically cut into square, diamond, or round shapes. Different types of Barfi vary in their color and texture.
45. Kalakand
Kalakand, or qalaqand or is a popular Pakistani sweet made out of solidified, sweetened milk and cottage cheese
46. Churma
Churma is a popular Rajasthani delicacy usually served with baatis and dal. It is coarsely ground wheat crushed and cooked with ghee and sugar. Traditionally it is made by mashing up Bajri or wheat flour baatis or rotis in ghee and jaggery. It is usually rich in calories.
47. Balushahi
Balushahi is a traditional dessert in northern Indian Cuisine, Pakistani Cuisine, Nepali cuisine and Bangladeshi cuisine. It is similar to a glazed doughnut in terms of ingredients, but differs in texture and taste. In South India, a similar pastry is known as Badushah.Balushahis are made of maida flour, and are deep-fried in clarified butter and then dipped in sugar syrup.
48. Laung Latta
If you have lived any time in India, you will know that milk is one of the base ingredients for sweets made here. In fact, milk is one of the main ingredients in curd yogurt and As the business card states, taste & profession is our passion. That is certainly true at Ksheer Sagar located on the Godowlia - Assi road in Sonarpura. It is one of the best places to buy sweets in Varanasi. They recently remodeled the shop to include a spacious glass enclosed interior. I like to get the yogurt poured into unfired clay bowls. They come in two sizes and two tastes--a normal sweetened yogurt and a pistachio sweetened yogurt. Of course you can also get all the main Indian sweets at Ksheer Sagar such as gulab jamun, jalebi and assorted barf. Drop on by some time and youll notice that the shop remains crowded--proof that whats written on the card is what is really offered!
49. Gulab jamun
Gulab jamun is a milk-solids -based dessert, similar to a dumpling, popular in countries of the South Asian Subcontinent such as India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Pakistan and Bangladesh, also in the Caribbean countries of Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname and Jamaica and in Mauritius. In Nepal it is widely known as Lal-Mohan, served with or without yogurt. It is made mainly from milk solids, traditionally from freshly curdled milk. In India, milk solids are prepared by heating milk over a low flame for a long time until most of the water content has evaporated. These milks solids, known as khoya in Pakistan and India, are kneaded into a dough, sometimes with a pinch of flour, and then shaped into small balls and deep fried at a low temperature of about 148
50. Peda
Peda, Pheda or Pera is a sweet from the Indian subcontinent, usually prepared in thick, semi-soft pieces. The main ingredients are khoa, sugar and traditional flavorings, including cardamom seeds, pistachio nuts and saffron. The colour varies from a creamy white to a caramel colour. The word pera is also generically used to mean a blob of any doughy substance, such as flour or (in the case of the sweet) khoa. Origin of Peda may be credited to the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, and the variety from the city of Mathura in that state was considered to be the best. Simultaneously, another origin, practice of Peda making, some unique varieties, and spread of this tradition may be attributed to the province of Saurashtra of Gujarat and its centers like Sihor, Rajkot, Palitana and Bhavnagar as well. Tradition and practice of Peda making can be traced back to late 1800s in Sihor while it picking up momentum in 20th century. Along with Rajkot and Bhavnagar now, there are several distinct varieties of Peda, originating from different centres of Saurashtra (region). In Gujarat, Pedas are called and pronounced as Penda


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