benefits of cumin

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Benefits of Cumin

1. Cumin
Cumin or jeera is a common ingredient in Indian kitchens. Apart from adding flavor to a dish, it has got health benefits too. Cumin (also known as Jeera) has a richness of history to give it a special place in the world of spices. Ancient Egyptians used it for the mummification process. And the humble jeera is a part of almost every Indian kitchen and on a hot summer day it s sheer bliss to have a glass of buttermilk with a dash of cumin powder.
2. History
Cumin has been in use since ancient times. Seeds excavated at the Indian site have been dated to the second millennium BC. They have also been reported from several New Kingdom levels of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites. In the ancient Egyptian civilisation cumin was used as spice and as preservative in mummification
3. Cultivation areas
The main producer and consumer of cumin is India. It produces 70% of the world production and consumes 90% of its own production (which is 63% of the world production). Other producers are Syria (7%), Turkey (6%) and Iran (6%). The remaining 11% production is assigned to other countries. Totally, around 300,000 tons of cumin per year are produced worldwide. 2007 India produced around 175,000 tons of cumin on an area of about 410,000 ha. I.e. the average yield is 0.43 tons per hectare.
4. Climatic requirements
Cumin is a drought tolerant, tropic or semi tropic crop. Its origin is most probably Egypt, Turkmenistan and the east Mediterranean. Cumin has a short growth season of 100
5. Cultivation parameters
Cumin is grown from seeds. The seeds need 2 to 5?C (36 to 41?F) for emergence, an optimum of 20
6. Traditional Cooking
Indian cuisine is the renowned name for the foods of the India. The various spices, herbs, and vegetables, including fruits grown in India, and are used to practice vegetarianism in Indian society. Indian Cuisine includes a variety of dishes and cooking techniques. Highly aromatic and delicate spices reflect Indian food
7. Iron for Energy and Immune Function
Cumin seeds, whose scientific name is Cuminum cyminum, are an excellent source of iron, a mineral that plays many vital roles in the body. Iron is an integral component of hemoglobin, which transports oxygen from the lungs to all body cells, and is also part of key enzyme systems for energy production and metabolism. Additionally, iron is instrumental in keeping your immune system healthy. Iron is particularly important for menstruating women, who lose iron each month during menses.
8. Seeds of Good Digestion
Cumin seeds have traditionally been noted to be of benefit to the digestive system, and scientific research is beginning to bear out cumin s age old reputation. Research has shown that cumin may stimulate the secretion of pancreatic enzymes, compounds necessary for proper digestion and nutrient assimilation.
9. Cancer Prevention
Cumin seeds may also have anti carcinogenic properties. In one study, cumin was shown to protect laboratory animals from developing stomach or liver tumors. This cancer protective effect may be due to cumin s potent free radical scavenging abilities as well as the ability it has shown to enhance the liver s detoxification enzymes.
10. Description
Cumin seeds resemble caraway seeds, being oblong in shape, longitudinally ridged, and yellow brown in color. Although the small cumin seed looks rather unassuming, it packs a punch when it comes to flavor, which can be described as penetrating and peppery with slight citrus overtones. Cumin s unique flavor complexity has made it an integral spice in the cuisines of Mexico, India and the Middle East.


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